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Dizionario di inglese del sito grammatica inglese: definizione traduzione e spiegazione grammaticale
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Definizione monolingua e traduzione front



Inglese grammatica

front


Verb

front (third-person singular simple present fronts, present participle fronting, simple past and past participle fronted)


  1. (intransitive, dated) To face (on, to), be pointed in a given direction.
    • 1726, Jonathan Swift, Gullivers Travels:
      The great gate fronting to the north was about four feet high, and almost two feet wide, through which I could easily creep.
    • 1999, George RR Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam 2011, p. 312:
      They emerged atop the broad curving steps that fronted on the Street of the Sisters, near the foot of Visenyas Hill.
    • 2010, Ingrid D Rowland, ""The Siege of Rome"", New York Review of Books, Blog, 26 Mar 2010:
      The palazzo has always fronted on a bus stop – but this putative man of the people has kindly put an end to that public service.
  2. (transitive) To face, be opposite to.
    • 1749, John Cleland, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, Penguin 1985, p. 66:
      After saluting her, he led her to a couch that fronted us, where they both sat down, and the young Genoese helped her to a glass of wine, with some Naples biscuit on a salver.
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice:
      [...] down they ran into the dining-room, which fronted the lane, in quest of this wonder; it was two ladies stopping in a low phaeton at the garden gate.
    • 1913, DH Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, Penguin 2006, p. 49:
      She sat on a seat under the alders in the cricket ground, and fronted the evening.
  3. (transitive) To face up to, to meet head-on, to confront.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.6:
      those that have willed to attaine to some greater excellence, have not beene content, at home, and at rest to expect the rigors of fortune [...]; but have rather gone to meet and front her before, and witting-earnestly cast themselves to the triall of the hardest difficulties.
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 2:
      What well-appointed leader fronts us here?
  4. (transitive) To adorn the front of; to have on the front.
    • 2001, Terry Goodkind, The Pillars of Creation, p. 148:
      Three tiers of balconies fronted with roped columns supporting arched openings looked down on the marble hall.
  5. (phonetics, transitive, intransitive) To pronounce with the tongue in a front position.
    • 2005, Paul Skandera / Peter Burleigh, A Manual of English Phonetics and Phonology, p. 48:
      The velar plosives are often fronted through the influence of a following front vowel, and retracted through the influence of a following back vowel.
  6. (linguistics, transitive) To move (a word or clause) to the start of a sentence.
  7. (intransitive, slang) To act as a front (for); to cover (for).
    • 2007, Harold Robbins, A Stone for Danny Fisher, p. 183:
      Everybody knew Skopas fronted for the fight mob even though he was officially the arena manager.
  8. (transitive) To lead or be the spokesperson of (a campaign, organisation etc.).
    • 2009 September 1, Mark Sweney, The Guardian:
      Ray Winstone is fronting a campaign for the Football Association that aims to stop pushy parents shouting abuse at their children during the grassroots football season.
  9. (transitive, colloquial) To provide money or financial assistance in advance to.
    • 2004, Danielle Steele, Ransom, p. 104:
      Im prepared to say that I fronted you the money for a business deal with me, and the investment paid off brilliantly.
  10. (intransitive) To assume false or disingenuous appearances.
    • 1993 November 19, Bobby Hill, “Mad Real”:
      So when I tell people where Im from and check their reactions, I know in my heart Im just frontin’. Because the way and where I lived then pales when compared to the way and where many youths are living today.
    • 2008, Briscoe/Akinyemi, ‘Womanizer’:
      Boy dont try to front, / I-I know just-just what you are, are-are.
    • 2008 Markus Naerheim, The City p. 531
      You know damned straight what this is about, or you aint as smart as you been frontin.
  11. to appear before, as in to front court.
Noun

front (plural fronts)


  1. The foremost side of something or the end that faces the direction it normally moves.
  2. The side of a building with the main entrance.
  3. A person or institution acting as the public face of some other, covert group.
    Officially its a dry-cleaning shop, but everyone knows its front for the mafia.
  4. (meteorology) The interface or transition zone between two airmasses of different density, often resulting in precipitation. Since the temperature distribution is the most important regulator of atmospheric density, a front almost invariably separates airmasses of different temperature.
  5. (military) An area where armies are engaged in conflict, especially the line of contact.
  6. (military) The lateral space occupied by an element measured from the extremity of one flank to the extremity of the other flank.
  7. (military) The direction of the enemy.
  8. (military) When a combat situation does not exist or is not assumed, the direction toward which the command is faced.
  9. (obsolete) A major military subdivision of the Soviet Army.
  10. (informal) An act, show, façade, persona: an intentional and false impression of oneself.
    He says he likes hip-hop, but I think its just a front.
    You dont need to put on a front. Just be yourself.
  11. (UK) a seafront or coastal promenade.
Adjective

front (not comparable)


  1. Located at or near the front.
    The front runner was thirty meters ahead of her nearest competitor.
  2. (comparable) (phonetics) Of a vowel pronounced near the tip of the tongue.
Traduzione italiano fronte |di fronte |anteriore |costa |davanti |essere di fronte |essere esposto |facciata |muso |parte anteriore |primo |prospetto |


Il nostro dizionario è liberamente ispirato al wikidizionario ....
The online encyclopedia in which any reasonable person can join us in writing and editing entries on any encyclopedic topic


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